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How to record live broadcasts to your account (aka. server side recording).

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Server side recording of live broadcasts is a feature available upon request to all paying customers at no additional cost. To enable this option for your account please send an e-mail to support (please remember to include your account user ID).

Please note that a connection drop during a broadcast will split the recording into multiple files so we recommend a good stable connection to avoid this from happening.

How to enable server side recording:

You can enable server side recording for any of your broadcasts by editing the broadcast settings for it and selecting the option Enable server side recording for this broadcast. Once this change is made, download the newly generated Adobe Media Live Encoder (previously named Flash Media Live Encoder or FMLE) configuration file and open it using Adobe Media Live Encoder settings (File -> Open). This will change the 'Stream' parameter in Adobe Media Live Encoder to include a parameter which enables server side recording.

Live stream server side recording

Manually enabling server side recording on other software or hardware live encoders:

Once you've enabled server side recording for a broadcast via your dashboard, the only other setting that needs to change is the Stream parameter/key in your live encoder settings. Simply append the string &record=1 to the stream parameter and our servers will record that broadcast.

For example:

Recording disabled: mystream?adbe-live-event=liveevent
Recording enabled: mystream?adbe-live-event=liveevent&record=1

How server side recording works:

Server side recordings are encoded and placed in your media library inside a folder named broadcast_recordings. Recordings are saved as MP4 H.264 videos and named using a timestamp and the broadcast name. The timestamp represents the date and time the broadcast was started. Recordings should appear inside your media library within 10 minutes of broadcast stoppage.

Broadcast recordings

Single vs. multi bitrate naming convention:

Sample broadcast recording filename for a regular (single bitrate) broadcast:

2016-03-23_21:38:05_mybroadcast.mp4

Sample broadcast recording for a multi or adaptive bitrate broadcast:

2016-03-23_21:38:05_mybroadcast1.mp4
2016-03-23_21:38:05_mybroadcast2.mp4
2016-03-23_21:38:05_mybroadcast3.mp4

Note how in the case of a multi bitrate broadcast each recording has a digit appended which represents the 1st, 2nd, etc bitrate encoding for that broadcast.

How to group multi bitrate recordings as one single item:

Let's say you want to make to make your multi bitrate broadcast available for playback on your web site or playlists using Adaptive Bitrate Streaming. Since the server already saved each bitrate encoding as a different file, this is just a matter of changing the filenames to conform to our naming convention for multi btirate videos. Using the above example, you would rename each video and change the appended digit to the string _[bitrate]kbps as shown below:

2016-03-23_21:38:05_mybroadcast_250kbps.mp4
2016-03-23_21:38:05_mybroadcast_700kbps.mp4
2016-03-23_21:38:05_mybroadcast_1200kbps.mp4

This will group all three filenames into one item in your media library and mark it as a multi bitrate video. Our platform now understands that all three files represent different encodings of the same video and can generate embed code which plays the broadcast recording using multi or adaptive bitrate streaming. You can learn more about our file naming convention for multi bitrate videos here.

How to download broadcast recordings:

You can download broadcast recordings by using FTP. If you are not sure how to use FTP please refer to this link.

Other information:

For redundancy purposes, in addition to server side recording we recommend that you also save a recording of your broadcasts locally on your computer. Adobe Media Live Encoder, WireCast, XSplit, and Open Broadcaster Software all support local recording of broadcasts. To learn how this is done in Adobe Media Live Encoder, please click here.

How to record live broadcasts to your account (aka. server side recording).

Server side recording of live broadcasts is a feature available upon request to all paying customers at no additional cost. To enable this option for your account please send an e-mail to support (please remember to include your account user ID).

Please note that a connection drop during a broadcast will split the recording into multiple files so we recommend a good stable connection to avoid this from happening.

How to enable server side recording:

You can enable server side recording for any of your broadcasts by editing the broadcast settings for it and selecting the option Enable server side recording for this broadcast. Once this change is made, download the newly generated Adobe Media Live Encoder (previously named Flash Media Live Encoder or FMLE) configuration file and open it using Adobe Media Live Encoder settings (File -> Open). This will change the 'Stream' parameter in Adobe Media Live Encoder to include a parameter which enables server side recording.

Live stream server side recording

Manually enabling server side recording on other software or hardware live encoders:

Once you've enabled server side recording for a broadcast via your dashboard, the only other setting that needs to change is the Stream parameter/key in your live encoder settings. Simply append the string &record=1 to the stream parameter and our servers will record that broadcast.

For example:

Recording disabled: mystream?adbe-live-event=liveevent
Recording enabled: mystream?adbe-live-event=liveevent&record=1

How server side recording works:

Server side recordings are encoded and placed in your media library inside a folder named broadcast_recordings. Recordings are saved as MP4 H.264 videos and named using a timestamp and the broadcast name. The timestamp represents the date and time the broadcast was started. Recordings should appear inside your media library within 10 minutes of broadcast stoppage.

Broadcast recordings

Single vs. multi bitrate naming convention:

Sample broadcast recording filename for a regular (single bitrate) broadcast:

2016-03-23_21:38:05_mybroadcast.mp4

Sample broadcast recording for a multi or adaptive bitrate broadcast:

2016-03-23_21:38:05_mybroadcast1.mp4
2016-03-23_21:38:05_mybroadcast2.mp4
2016-03-23_21:38:05_mybroadcast3.mp4

Note how in the case of a multi bitrate broadcast each recording has a digit appended which represents the 1st, 2nd, etc bitrate encoding for that broadcast.

How to group multi bitrate recordings as one single item:

Let's say you want to make to make your multi bitrate broadcast available for playback on your web site or playlists using Adaptive Bitrate Streaming. Since the server already saved each bitrate encoding as a different file, this is just a matter of changing the filenames to conform to our naming convention for multi btirate videos. Using the above example, you would rename each video and change the appended digit to the string _[bitrate]kbps as shown below:

2016-03-23_21:38:05_mybroadcast_250kbps.mp4
2016-03-23_21:38:05_mybroadcast_700kbps.mp4
2016-03-23_21:38:05_mybroadcast_1200kbps.mp4

This will group all three filenames into one item in your media library and mark it as a multi bitrate video. Our platform now understands that all three files represent different encodings of the same video and can generate embed code which plays the broadcast recording using multi or adaptive bitrate streaming. You can learn more about our file naming convention for multi bitrate videos here.

How to download broadcast recordings:

You can download broadcast recordings by using FTP. If you are not sure how to use FTP please refer to this link.

Other information:

For redundancy purposes, in addition to server side recording we recommend that you also save a recording of your broadcasts locally on your computer. Adobe Media Live Encoder, WireCast, XSplit, and Open Broadcaster Software all support local recording of broadcasts. To learn how this is done in Adobe Media Live Encoder, please click here.